Working with the Fence Seledion Option AutoCad Help

Next you’ll work on finishing the new bedroom door and entry. Once again you will get a chance to work with the Fence selection option. Fence is a great tool for selecting locations on objects that would otherwise be difficult to select. With Fence you can select objects by crossing over them with a rubber-banding line. It’s like selecting objects by crossing them out. In addition, the point at which the rubberbanding line crosses the object is equivalent to a pick point. This is important when using commands that respond differently depending on where objects are selected. The following exercise shows how the Fence selection option can be helpful in selecting objects in tight spaces.

1: Copy the existing entry door downward, including header and jambs (see Figure 12.14). Use the Endpoint override to locate the door accurately.

2. Clean up the walls by adding new lines and filleting others, as shown in Figure 12.15.

TIP

Usethe midpoint of the door header as the first axis endpoint.

3. Use Stretch (click Stretch on the Modify toolbar) to move the entry door a distance of 8′ (244cm) to the right as shown in Figure 12.16. Remember to use a crossing window to select the objects and endpoints you want to stretch.
4. Once you’ve moved the entry door mirror it in the same way you mirrored the other door.

FIG U R

FIG U R<~ 1 2 • 1 4 : 0:: L!J 1
Using an existing door to
create a door opening

FIGURE 12.15: Cleaning up the wall

FIGURE 12.15:
Cleaning up the wall

FIGURE 12.16:

FIGURE 12.16:

In the foregoing exercise, you once again used parts of a previous drawing instead of creating new parts. In only a few instances are you adding new objects.
1. Now set the view of your drawing so it looks similar to Figure 12.17 and turn off Polar Tracking and Running Osnaps if they are on.
2. Click Extend on the Modify toolbar, or type Ex.J at the command prompt.
3. AttheSelect boundary edge(s) Select objects: prompt pick the wall at the bottom of the screen, as shown in Figure 12.17, and press.J. Just as with Trim the Extend command requires that you first select a set of objects to define the boundary of the extension, and then select the objects you wish to extend.
4.At the Select object to extend: prompt, you need 0 pick the two lines just below the closet door. To do this, first use the Fence selection option.
5. At the First Fence point: prompt click a point just to the left of the lines you want to extend.
6. Make sure the Or the mode IS off. Then at the Undo/<Endpoint of 1;ne>: prompt pick a point to the right of the two lines so that the fence crosses over them (see the top image of Figure 1:?17).
7. Press .J. The two lines extend to the wall.
8. Press .J again to exit the Extend command.
9. Click Trim and then select the two lines you just extended.
10. Press ..J to finish your selection.
11. Type F..Jand then pick two points to place a fence between the endpoints of the two selected lines (see the bottom image of Figure 12.17).
12. Use a combination of Trim ~d Fillet to clean up the other walls.
13. Add another closet door on the right side of the new closet space you just created. Your drawing should look like Figure 12.18.

FIGURE 12.17:

FIGURE 12.17:

 

FIGURE 12.18:

FIGURE 12.18:

The Extend tool worlesjust like the Trim tool: First you select the boundary objects and thenyou select the objects you want to modify. Here again, you used the Fence selection option to select the object to extend. In this situation the Fence option is crucial because it may be more difficult to select the lines individually.

TIP

The Trim and Extend tools do not allow you to trim or extend objects in a block. Fortunately AutoCAD 2000 indudes two bonus utilities on the Express Standard toolbar that williet you select trim and extend boundary objects from within a block. SeeChapter ’19 for details.

Posted on November 9, 2015 in Advanced Editing Methods

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