Category Archive for: Drawing Curves and Solid Fills

Drawing Curves and Solid Fills

So farin this book, you’ve been using basic lines, arcs, and circles to create your drawings. Now it’s time to add polylines and spline curves to your repertoire. Polylines offer many options for creating forms, including solid fills. Spline curves are perfect for drawing smooth, nonlinear objects. The splines are true NURBS curves. NURBSstands for Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines Introducing…

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Smoothing Polylines

There are many ways to create a curve in AutoCAD. If you don’t need the representation of a curve to be exactly accurate, you can use a polyline curve. In the following exercise, you will draw a polyline curve to represent a contour on a topographic  map. 1. Open the Topo dwg drawing that is included on…

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Creating a Polyline Spline Curve

The Pedit command’s Spline option (named after the spline tool used in manual drafting) offers you a way to draw smoother and more controllable curves than those produced by the Fit option. A polyline spline does not pass through the vertex points as a fitted curve does. Instead, the vertex points act asweights pulling the curve in their direction.…

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Using True Spline Curves

So far, you’ve been working with polylines to generate spline curves. The advantage to using polylines for curves is that they can be enhanced in other ways. You can modify their width, for instance, or join several curves together. But at times you will need a more exact representation of a curve. The Splineobject, created with Draw> Spline, offers…

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Marking Divisions on Curves

Perhaps one of the most difficult things to do in manual drafting is to mark regular intervals on a curve. AutoCAD offers the Divide and Measure commands to help you perform this task with speed and accuracy. Dividing Objects into Segments of Equal Length The Divide command is used to divide an object into a specific number…

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Sketching with AutoCAD

No discussion of polylines would be complete without mentioning the Sketch command. Though AutoCAD isn’t a sketch program, you can draw “freehand” using the Sketch command. With Sketch, you can rough in ideas in a free-form way.,and later overlay a more formal drawing using the usual lines, arcs, and cirdes. You can use Sketch with a mouse, but…

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Overlapping Solid Lines and Shaded Fills

If you use an inkjet plotter, raster plotter, or laser printer that can convert solid areas into screened or gray-shaded areas, you may encounter the problem of shading areas overlapping lines and hiding them. This problem may not be apparent until you actually plot the drawing; it frequently occurs when a gray-shaded area is bounded by lines. The left…

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